NSX Concept ...is coming to Australia

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Born from a pure racing philosophy.

The NSX has always been a sportscar like no other. Eschewing brute force, Honda pioneered the all-aluminium monocoque body to deliver a superior power-to-weight ratio and phenomenal rigidity. The new NSX Concept stays true to this ‘man maximum, machine minimum’ philosophy, using lightweight materials and revolutionary design to put its pilot at the heart of a pure driving experience.

Hybrid power & SH-AWD.

Supercar acceleration and handling whilst achieving outstanding fuel efficiency. That is the incredible vision of the NSX Concept, achieved with an astounding hybrid powertrain. A mid-mounted V6 engine is coupled with an electric motor to power the rear wheels; and at the front of the vehicle are two more electric motors, independently powering each of the front wheels. It is these front motors that feature prominently in the NSX Concept's awesome Sports Hybrid Super-Handling All-Wheel Drive (SH-AWD). They feature a bilateral torque control system; as you turn into a corner, the inside wheel creates negative torque, generating electrical power that is diverted instantly into additional positive torque on the outside wheel. The end result is an unparalleled handling experience.

A rich history

1990 - 2005

Experimenting with the unknown, a new dream is born.

The beginnings of the NSX trace back to 1984, when Honda began experimenting with a mid-mounted, rear-wheel drive format. Expecting to create a more efficient and dynamic driving package, they instead found themselves marvelling at the unique and thrilling handling of this test car. The memory of their unexpected discovery would follow them, and the seed of a new dream was sown. At the same time, Honda made its celebrated return to Formula 1; the time was right, and in 1985, development of the NSX began in earnest.

The idea: to create a sportscar unlike any other.

"What particular qualities would a sportscar have in representing the Honda name?" This simple question would prove the subject of long discussions amongst the development team, and the memory of the test car in 1984 pushed them to strive for the most thrilling and dynamic performance they could. To guide themselves they created the famous "Milky Way" diagram, where power-to-weight ratio (running performance) was plotted on the Y-axis and wheelbase-to-weight ratio (turning/stopping performance) was plotted on the X-axis. They determined that a true Honda sportscar would push beyond the boundaries of the typical sportscar, and pointed their aim as close to a Formula 1 machine as possible.

Breaking new ground to create the first truly modern sportscar.

In 1986, the most common material in cars was sheet steel, but early tests proved what the engineers already suspected: steel was too heavy and cumbersome; it would require a larger, heavier engine and would not deliver the breakthrough driving dynamics they knew were possible. During one of many trips between the Tochigi and Wako R&D centres, they realised that the bullet train was made entirely from aluminium. Aluminium was much lighter than steel and more durable, yet expensive and notoriously difficult to mould and weld; no automaker had ever built a car primarily of aluminium. Many suppliers and external parties thought the development team must be crazy to try such thing, but a revolutionary sportscar would only come from an incredible feat of engineering. Their perseverance paid off, and the NSX became the pioneer of the all-aluminium monocoque body.

Human maximum, machine minimum

The R&D strategy pushed Honda to create a car that would have dynamic performance akin to a Formula 1 car. It would deliver astounding performance, and would demand superior driving skill to control the car at its limits. But the Honda philosophy was also that driver and passenger should occupy a hallowed space within the car; the moment the pursuit of pure mechanical performance compromised the ability of the driver to utilise it, it brought the quality and experience of the car down dramatically. The final concept for the car embraced a vision that only Honda could deliver: "To create a sportscar for a new era, we should balance human feelings and vehicle performance at higher levels."

Ayrton Senna and the NSX

In 1989 during testing at the Suzuka Circuit, the development team had the opportunity to ask legendary Formula 1 driver Ayrton Senna to drive the car. In his own humble way, after completing several laps he advised the engineers that he felt the car lacked rigidity: "I'm not sure I can really give you appropriate advice on a mass-production car, but I feel it's a little fragile." Inspired to respond to this challenge, the team moved to the Nurburgring in Germany, where they spent eight months putting the car to the ultimate test. They eventually improved the rigidity of the car by a phenomenal 50%, and in doing so delivered the thrilling performance they had sought. They had arrived at the consummate integration between man and machine.

NSX: New Sportscar eXperimental

In 1989 during testing at the Suzuka Circuit, the development team had the opportunity to ask legendary Formula 1 driver
Ayrton Senna to drive the car. In his own humble way, after completing several laps he advised the engineers that he felt the
car lacked rigidity: "I'm not sure I can really give you appropriate advice on a mass-production car, but I feel it's a little fragile."
Inspired to respond to this challenge, the team moved to the Nurburgring in Germany, where they spent eight months putting
the car to the ultimate test. They eventually improved the rigidity of the car by a phenomenal 50%, and in doing so delivered
the thrilling performance they had sought. They had arrived at the consummate integration between man and machine.

Revolution. Again.

In 2011 Honda set the motoring world alight when it announced the return of the NSX. Nothing less than another supercar revolution would fulfil the legend, and nothing less was delivered at the North American International Auto Show in January 2012, when the first Concept was unveiled. A wildly energetic design encased a radical new Sports Hybrid powertrain, featuring a direct-injected V6 engine, three electric motors and an All-Wheel Drive setup featuring a bi-lateral torque control system for steering performance like never before; the aim is to combine dynamic supercar capabilities with exceptional environmental performance. The NSX is back, and will be manufactured from 2015 at a custom made facility in Ohio, USA.

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